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Cover for  Käthe Kollwitz
Käthe Kollwitz
Permanent Exhibition
After more than 25 years of enthusiastic collecting, the museum's exhibits now comprise about 300 drawings, more than 500 prints, and all her posters and sculptures. Among the drawings - a focal point of the collection - there are some of her most impressive works, many from her later phase when she was predominantly preoccupied with the theme of death. Of her earlier work, three of the less than ten pastel and charcoal drawings that have been preserved and which she produced for the satirical periodical "Simplicissimus" are represented in the museum's collection. Sketch-like preparatory drawings, which throw light on the genesis of important prints, are also part of the collection. A focal point of these works is the history of the creation of her cycle entitled "Peasants' War" (1901-1908) and her series named "War" (1921/1922). In the field of prints all her great cycles are represented. These are milestones not only in the development of Käthe Kollwitz' work, but also in the development of 20th century prints in general. These prints include her earlier cycles "A Weavers' Revolt" (1893-1897) and "Peasants' War" (1901-1908) which were based on literary models, the woodcut series "War" (1921-1922), "Proletariat" (1925) and the later series of lithographs "Death" (1934-1937). In addition, the collection comprises individual works such as her last lithograph "Seed for sowing should not be milled" from the year 1941, which is the artist's legacy in her fight against war and the death of soldiers in action. Recently, the Käthe Kollwitz Museum in Cologne succeeded in acquiring very rare prints from an important private collection which had been largely unknown to the general public. Among them are three early self-portraits: two etchings and a large-scale colour lithograph from 1903/4. The "Self-portrait en face" is printed in four colours. Being an experimental leaf, no further prints were made. For this reason, this print is unique and a highlight in the artist's œuvre as well as an example of the museum's successful acquisition policy. The 15 bronze sculptures are of particular importance as almost all the examples shown in the museum are rare early casts. Together with the copy of "The Mourning Parents" in the ruin of the church of Alt St. Alban and the relief on the Levy tombstone in the Jewish cemetery in Bocklemünd, Cologne provides the unique opportunity of an overview of the artist's complete sculptural work. The Kollwitz posters, all of which are represented in the museum, are a rare highlight of the collection. The artist created them above all in the 1920s following her motto "I would like to exert influence in these times". The posters express an anti-war message and emphasise the artist's commitment to social justice, humanity and peace. Another part of the collection which is meanwhile almost complete is Käthe Kollwitz' book illustrations. All the works by Käthe Kollwitz illustrated in our Internet presentation are part of the collection of the Käthe Kollwitz Museum Köln.
Event information:
Cologne | Käthe Kollwitz Museum
10/10/2018 - 10/10/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Eye to I
Eye to I
Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today
Drawing primarily from the National Portrait Gallery’s vast collection of self-portraits, this exhibition will explore how American artists have chosen to portray themselves since the beginning of the last century. As people are confronted each day with “selfies” via social media and as they continue to examine the fluidity of contemporary identity, this is an opportune time to reassess the significance of self-portraiture in relation to the country’s history and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 75 works by artists such as Josef Albers, Patricia Cronin, Imogen Cunningham, Elaine de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Joan Jonas, Jacob Lawrence, Alice Neel, Louise Nevelson, Diego Rivera, Lucas Samaras, Fritz Scholder, Roger Shimomura, Shahzia Sikander and Martin Wong. “Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today” is curated by Brandon Brame Fortune, chief curator, National Portrait Gallery. This exhibition concludes the Portrait Gallery’s 50th anniversary celebrations, and an expanded, illustrated companion book will be published in spring 2019.
Event information:
Washington | National Portrait Gallery
02/11/2018 - 18/08/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Utrecht, Caravaggio und Europa
Utrecht, Caravaggio and Europe
At the start of the Dutch Golden Age, Rome was the centre of the world. Young painters from across Europe made their way to the Eternal City, where – so the rumour went – the painter Caravaggio had caused a revolution. A new realism in the art of painting, unparalleled drama, grand gestures and mysteries of light: everyone wanted to see it for themselves. Among them were the Utrecht painters Dirck van Baburen, Hendrick ter Brugghen and Gerard van Honthorst. During the heyday of European Caravaggism, between 1600-1630, some 2700 artists were listed in Rome, of which 572 were foreigners. They all visited the same churches and viewed the same collections. They conversed with each other, and of course they painted! And they painted the same themes, used the same sources of inspiration, but the works they produced were nonetheless very different. Utrecht, Caravaggio and Europe examines precisely these differences between the European followers of Caravaggio. By presenting the works on the basis of themes, it is immediately evident how each artist remained rooted in his own cultural background. Utrecht, Caravaggio and Europe brings the Rome of 1600 to 1630 to Utrecht. Presenting seventy masterpieces, this exhibition is the first to display the Utrecht Caravaggists alongside their European counterparts: the Italian painters Caravaggio, Bartolomeo Manfredi, Cecco da Caravaggio, Giovanni Antonio Galli (Lo Spadarino), Giovanni Serodine, Orazio Borgianni and Orazio Gentileschi, the Spaniard Jusepe de Ribera, the French Nicolas Régnier, Nicolas Tournier, Simon Vouet and Valentin de Boulogne, and the Flemish Gerard Seghers and Theodoor Rombouts. The exhibition comprises over sixty loan pieces, from museum and private collections across Europe and the United States, including the Vatican Museums, the Louvre (Paris), the Galleria degli Uffizi (Florence), the National Gallery of Art of London and the National Gallery of Art of Washington DC, but also from churches in Rome. The paintings by the Utrecht Caravaggists are so recognisably Dutch, because they took Caravaggio’s realism one step further. Baburen and Ter Brugghen also painted the ugly sides of reality: monstrous noses, rotten teeth, dirty fingernails. Ter Brugghen even has the questionable honour of having painted the ugliest but also the most realistic baby in seventeenth century art. Gerard van Honthorst was very successful in Rome. Honthorst’s invention of illuminating his scenes from a hidden, indirect source of light became so famous that he was nicknamed ‘Gherardo delle Notti’: Gerard of the Nights. Just like Dirck van Baburen, he received important commissions for altar pieces, and works by both artists were purchased by important collectors such as Cardinal Giustiniani, who was also a patron of Caravaggio. Their paintings were hung in the halls of his palazzo, next to those of the Italian, Flemish, French and Spanish painters. The exhibitions follows the three Utrecht artists on their Roman adventure, demonstrates how this affected their work, and displays their most accomplished pieces.
Event information:
Utrecht | Centraal museum
15/12/2018 - 24/03/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  True to the Eyes
True to the Eyes
The Howard and Carole Tanenbaum Photography Collection
This exhibition presents more than 200 photographs from the extraordinary and eclectic collection of the long-time Toronto couple. The Tanenbaums were among the first Canadian collectors to engage with the medium during its late 20th century rise to prominence; over time, they assembled one of the country’s great holdings of photography. True to the Eyes highlights a range of humanistic photographs in many genres, from anonymous vernacular imagery to masterworks by such notable photographers as Southworth & Hawes, William Notman, Ernest J. Bellocq, Brassaï, Lisette Model, Diane Arbus, Mary Ellen Mark, Jim Goldberg, and Edward Burtynsky. Through four decades of building their collection, the Tanenbaums have acquired images revealing aspects of family, wealth and poverty, civil rights, nature and the land, and Canadian life. The exhibition is accompanied by a richly-illustrated book published in partnership with Hirmer Verlag.
Event information:
Toronto | Main Gallery and University Gallery, Ryerson Image Centre
23/01/2019 - 07/04/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Frans Hals
Frans Hals Potraits: A Family Reunion
This exhibition is the first devoted to the family portraiture of Frans Hals (1582/83–1666), one of the foremost painters of the Dutch Golden Age. Organized by the Toledo Museum of Art and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels, the exhibition was prompted by the Toledo Museum of Art’s acquisition in 2011 of Frans Hals’s Van Campen Family Portrait in a Landscape, as well as the recent conservation of Brussels’ Three Children of the Van Campen Family. These two works originally formed one composition, separated for unknown reasons likely in the late 18th century or early 19th century. The exhibition reunites the sections of the Toledo/Brussels painting, where it will be shown with the three other family portraits painted by the artist, and includes loans from the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the National Gallery in London, the Cincinnati Art Museum and other distinguished collections.
Event information:
Brussels | The Royal Museums of Fine Arts
01/02/2019 - 19/05/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Harald Sohlberg
Harald Sohlberg
Our first show of 2019 will showcase the highly original landscapes of the Norwegian symbolist artist, Harald Sohlberg (1869 – 1935), arguably one of the greatest masters of landscape painting in the history of Norwegian art. Timed to coincide with the 150th anniversary of Sohlberg’s birth it will be the first major show of his work outside of Norway. Like Edvard Munch, Sohlberg strongly denied the influence of other contemporary artists, disassociating himself from discussions about where he belonged in the history of art. Instead, he relegated the origins of his artistic awakening to his own psyche and to the intense stories and mythologies of the Norwegian land. Consequently, Sohlberg’s paintings depict the wilderness of the Nordic landscape, the soft beauty of the flower fields and the harsh cold of the winter. This major retrospective will show the breadth and ambiguity of Sohlberg’s art whilst revealing its relevance beyond Norway’s borders. It will trace Sohlberg’s entire artistic career, from his earliest production as a twenty-year-old in 1889 through to the last year of his life and reveal influences such as Norwegian Naturalism and Symbolism, which he was exposed to during his training in Copenhagen and Christiania. The exhibition will also include Sohlberg’s iconic landscape, Winter Night in the Mountains, regarded as the ‘National Painting of Norway’.
Event information:
London | Dulwich Picture Gallery
13/02/2019 - 02/06/2019
Accompanying publication:
Agnes Pelton
Desert Transcendentalist
Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist is the first survey of this obscure American painter in over 24 years. Born to American parents in Stuttgart, Germany, Pelton (1881-1961) and her family briefly lived in Basel, Switzerland before returning to the United States in 1888. A graduate of the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, she began experimenting with abstraction in the early 1900s in New York, eventually exhibiting in the Armory Show of 1913 at the invitation of Walt Kuhn. Intentionally moving away from the “mainstream” arts community, Pelton eventually settled in Cathedral City, California. She painted conventional desert landscapes to make a living, but it was her abstract studies of earth and light, biomorphic compositions of delicate veils, shimmering stars, and atmospheric horizon lines, that distinguished her work. A believer in numerology, astrology, and faith healing, Pelton’s abstract compositions propelled her into an esoteric world epitomized by the Transcendental Painting Group (1938-1942), a short-lived group that promoted abstract, non-objective art. Although Pelton received some attention during her lifetime, she has been relatively unknown within the field of American Art. Approximately 40 – 45 works will comprise this exhibition shedding light on Pelton’s artistic contribution to American Modernism, while examining her practice against a broader, international framework of spiritual and esoteric abstraction. Accompanied by a fully illustrated exhibition publication edited by the organizing curator of the exhibition, Gilbert Vicario with contributions by Elizabeth Armstrong, Director, Palm Springs Museum of Art; Dr. Michael Zakian, Director, Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Pepperdine University; Dr. Susan Aberth, Associate Professor of Art History; Coordinator, Theology, Bard College; and Dr. Erika Doss, Professor, Department of American Studies, University of Notre Dame.
Event information:
Phoenix | Phoenix Art Museum
09/03/2019 - 08/09/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Fiction and Fabrication
Fiction and Fabrication
Photography of Architecture after the Digital Turn
Fiction and Fabrication gathers nearly 50 artists who build and manipulate images of architectural objects and spaces. Marking 30 years since Photoshop was invented, and digital tools invaded photographic production, this exhibition focuses on the imagery of architecture as a central theme to an expanded practice of photography in contemporary art. From the seminal works of Andreas Gurski, Thomas Ruff, Jeff Wall or Thomas Demand to the fictional creations of Beate Gütschow, Oliver Boberg or Isabel Brison, the show offers a panorama of architectural photography that evades objective approaches and favours fictionalised takes on reality between cinematic gazes, image deconstruction and more politicised narratives. At a time when digital tools preside over the making of architectural images for media consumption, fictions stemming from the art world appear here as a critical alternative that questions and expands the concept of architecture.
Event information:
Lissabon | MAAT, Museu de Arte, Arquitetura e Tecnologia
19/03/2019 - 26/08/2019
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Ursula von Rydingsvard
Ursula von Rydingsvard
The Contour of Feeling
Monumental wood sculptures by Ursula von Rydingsvard (b. 1942, Deensen, Germany) evoke the grandeur and power of nature. They simultaneously bear evidence of the artist’s meticulous process of cutting, shaping, and assembling thousands of cedar blocks. The Contour of Feeling focuses on von Rydingsvard’s artistic development since 2000 and her continued commitment to experimentation. The presentation includes many sculptures not previously exhibited in the United States. Made from wood or other organic materials, including leather, silk, and hair, these works present a window into the emotional fragility and imposing scale that define von Rydingsvard’s art. The exhibition is organized by the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, and marks the artist’s first solo exhibition in Washington, D.C.
Event information:
Washington D.C. | National Museum of the Women in the Arts
22/03/2019 - 28/07/2019
Accompanying publication:
Katharina Alt. Boxing Cuba
Boxing in Cuba is much more than a sport, it is part of Cuban culture, not unlike soccer in Germany. However, the importance of boxing for young people' in Cuba is of a much more vital quality. Boxing is a possibility to fight for something beyond titles and awards, it is the possibility to fight for a better life. Katharina Alt, who completed part of her training as a photographer in Neu-Ulm, travels to Cuba at the end of 2015, to experience and document the meaning of boxing in Cuban society. She doesn't focus on the internationally successful professionals, the world champions and Olympic gold medalists. Naturally, Alt doesn't ignore them, but she doesn't idolise them either: Her approach to photographing them is unpretentious and personal, just as she approaches the young boys practicing, the coaches and doctors, active boxers and retired athletes. Likewise, Alt does not focus on boxing as a sports event or the ring, she also shows people in private, their homes, out on the streets, totally relaxed. „Boxing Cuba“ is not just a documentary about boxing in Cuba, it is a very special view on Cuban culture. Opening: Friday, 22 Märch 2019, 7-9 pm
Event information:
Ulm | Stadthaus Ulm
23/03/2019 - 26/05/2019
Accompanying publication:
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