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Cover for  Set in Stone
Set in Stone
Lithography in Paris, 1815 - 1900
Invented in Munich in 1796, the new printmaking medium of lithography introduced a simpler, faster, and more economical means of producing all types of printed matter. This exhibition of more than 120 works, almost exclusively chosen from the Zimmerli Art Museum’s rich collection of nineteenth-century French graphic arts, presents a survey of French lithography from its establishment in Paris around 1815 through the end of the nineteenth century. By the 1820s, Paris had emerged as a major center of artistic lithography as the medium was taken up by both established and rising artists, including Horace Vernet, Nicolas Charlet, Théodore Géricault, and Eugène Delacroix. Their example inspired an ongoing development of the creation and production of lithographs by French artists, printers, and publishers which culminated in the 1890s with large color lithographic posters by such artists as Jules Chéret and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. The exhibition is funded in part by Ruth Schimmel, the Estate of Arline DuBrow, and donors to the Zimmerli’s Major Exhibition Fund: James and Kathrin Bergin, Alvin and Joyce Glasgold, Charles and Caryl Sills, the Voorhees Family Endowment, and the Jerome A. Yavitz Charitable Foundation, Inc.–Stephen Cypen, President. Organized by Christine Giviskos, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and European Art
Event information:
New Brunswick | Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University
01-21-2018 - 07-29-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Contraption
Contraption
Rediscovering California Jewish Artists
Contraption: Rediscovering California Jewish Artists is a group show that presents the work of sixteen California-identified artists of Jewish descent—both historical and living—whose work refers to the machine either literally or metaphorically. Some of the artists are rarely seen now. Among the living artists, there will be large-scale mechanical installations by Bernie Lubell and Sheri Simons, as well as ceramics, drawings, sculpture and paintings by Ned Kahn, Bella Feldman, Howard Fried, and Annabeth Rosen.
Event information:
San Francisco | The Contemporary Jewish Museum
02-22-2018 - 07-29-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  BMW i
BMW i
Visionary Mobility
From March 2018 to September 2019, the Bowl of the BMW Museum will be dedicated to a wide range of subjects, including electric mobility, carbon, battery technology and renewable raw materials. A themed area of around 30 stations will demonstrate the diversity of electric mobility, various aspects of sustainable material selection and production, as well as some of the challenges facing emission-free mobility in the future. As part of continuing technological developments, the first approaches to solving these problems have already been implemented successfully. The task now is to make further advancements in digitalisation that would allow for fully autonomous driving. The BMW i brand stands for visionary mobility and vehicle concepts. It implements innovations and thereby contributes pioneering work within the enterprise. The brand’s drive is electric, its values sustainable and its design progressive. The BMW Museum is honouring the achievements of the brand that first set new standards with the BMW i3 and the BMW i8 and revolutionised individual mobility in large cities through a variety of mobility services. But it did not stop there: BMW i launched countless new, independent business areas within the enterprise, and has been aiming for new horizons and taking on new challenges since the beginning of 2018. Once again, the brand is carrying out pioneering work and is ready to realise new innovations.
Event information:
Munich | BMW Museum
03-01-2018 - 09-30-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Joan Jonas
Joan Jonas
A pioneer of performance
Hero to a generation of younger artists, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of performance and video who has pushed the boundaries of art for the last five decades. Experience the largest exhibition of Jonas’s work ever held in the UK. Early works from the late 1960s are shown alongside recent installations dealing with topical themes such as climate change and extinction. You can see her landmark installations including Organic Honey, The Juniper Tree and Reanimation. For the first time at Tate Modern, a single artist’s work is explored in the exhibition galleries, and in film screenings in the Starr Cinema and installations in the Tanks – an experimental exhibition for an experimental artist. Joan Jonas will also perform live alongside other artists as part of the BMW Tate Live Exhibition: Ten Days Six Nights programme. Organised by Tate Modern and Haus der Kunst, Munich​​​​​​​
Event information:
London | Tate Modern
03-14-2018 - 08-05-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Beyond Klimt
Beyond Klimt
New Horizons in Central Europe
Gustav Klimt is probably the artist most associated with Austrian art. His death in 1918 – the same year as the deaths of Egon Schiele, Koloman Moser, and Otto Wagner – is seen as the end of an era. However, their influence on the art world had waned even before this. Only peripherally affected by the political turmoil, a vibrant art scene developed in the countries of the Austro-Hungarian Empire with artists striving for change. The exhibition at the Lower Belvedere will guide you through this post-Klimt era. The interwar years are characterized by the wish for international connections that transcended new political and ideological boundaries. There was a vibrant exchange of ideas between artists resulting in constructivist, expressionist, and fantastical trends. Cosmopolitan networks emerged among the artists of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire while art magazines made an increasingly important contribution to disseminating these new ideas. The outbreak of the Second World War brought this internationalism to an abrupt end and the sense of a shared culture faded, once again, into the background. The exhibition seeks to reveal the parallels during this period and demonstrate continuity and change in the art of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its successor nation states. Featuring works by around eighty artists including Josef Capek, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, Albin Egger-Lienz, Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka, Koloman Moser, Antonin Prochaska, Egon Schiele, Lajos Tihanyi, and many more.
Event information:
Vienna | Lower Belvedere / Orangery
03-23-2018 - 08-26-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Landscapes After Ruskin
Landscapes After Ruskin
Redefining the Sublime
Landscapes after Ruskin: Redefining the Sublime explores contemporary painting, photography, sculpture, and video through the lens of influential English art critic and social thinker John Ruskin (1819–1900), who argued that the artist’s principal responsibility is “truth to nature.” For Ruskin, this “truth” was more than just a technical representation of the natural world on canvas but also a depiction of it as experienced by humankind. In Landscapes after Ruskin, guest curator and artist Joel Sternfeld examines how, in a world overwhelmed by industrial development and environmental uncertainty, contemporary artists are discovering new beauties and terrors associated with nature and, in so doing, invoking an updated sense of the sublime. The exhibition features a wide range of works by over fifty artists, including Richard Artschwager, Christiane Baumgartner, Katherine Bradford, Spencer Finch, Neil Jenney, Raymond Pettibon, Michal Rovner, Ai Weiwei, and David Wojnarowicz, among others. Organized by the Hall Art Foundation, the exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated catalogue.
Event information:
New York | Grey Art Gallery
04-17-2018 - 07-07-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Gurlitt: Status Report
Gurlitt: Status Report
Nazi Art Theft and its Consequences
In the second part of the exhibition Gurlitt: Status Report, the Kunstmuseum Bern is again mounting a selection of works from the Gurlitt “art trove.” This selection comprises pieces that were seized by the Nazis in their persecution campaigns as well as artworks whose provenance and circumstances of acquisition still can not be conclusively ascertained today. Nazi Art Theft and its Consequences traces the Nazi looting of European Jews and elucidates the role of art dealers and museums in the expropriation campaigns of the regime. Hildebrand Gurlitt was involved in forced sales and dealt with artworks that were either stolen or confiscated from museums as “degenerate art.” The works bequeathed provide a direct link to the biographies of his contemporaries who were persecuted by the Nazis. Most of the former owners were Jewish artists, collectors, and art dealers. The exhibition devotes a separate section to the “restitution” of looted art from the Gurlitt “art trove.” An exhibition of the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn augmented by the Kunstmuseum Bern. Curator: Nikola Doll
Event information:
Bern | Kunstmuseum Bern
04-19-2018 - 07-15-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Ursula von Rydingsvard
Ursula von Rydingsvard
The Contour of Feeling
“We don’t know the contour of feeling; we only know what molds it from without.” – Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926), Fourth Duino Elegy Celebrated as one of the most influential sculptors working today, Ursula von Rydingsvard is best known for her large-scale works and signature use of cedar wood. Her sculptures’ abstract shapes reference the mark of the human hand—evidence of the artist’s meticulous process of cutting, shaping, and assembling her works from thousands of cedar blocks—while simultaneously evoking the grandeur and power of nature. Guest curated by Mark Rosenthal, Ursula von Rydingsvard: The Contour of Feeling focuses on von Rydingsvard’s artistic development since 2000 and her continued commitment to experimentation throughout her career. Alongside a survey of recent works, the inclusion of select early sculptures will provide insight into the artist’s longstanding material and thematic interests. Featuring approximately 20 works—over half of which are large scale—the exhibition includes many sculptures never before exhibited in the United States. The Contour of Feeling will also mark the debut of a new large-scale sculpture created in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum specifically for the exhibition. Constructed from leather—a first for the artist—the piece’s scale is in keeping with recent work, while the new material represents an expansion for von Rydingsvard’s practice. It will mark the second collaboration between the artist and FWM, the first being in 1989 when she created a new work from felt. By spotlighting her more recent work and contrasting it with earlier pieces, Ursula von Rydingsvard: The Contour of Feeling highlights the artist’s evolution and presents a window into a unique synthesis of emotional fragility and imposing scale in her work that marks von Rydingsvard as an extraordinary artist of our time.
Event information:
Philadelphia | The Fabric Workshop and Museum
04-27-2018 - 08-26-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Hello World
Hello World
Revising a Collection
Hello World. Revising a Collection is a critical inquiry into the collection of the Nationalgalerie and its predominantly Western focus: What could the collection look like today, had an understanding characterised its concept of art, and consequently also its genesis, that was more open to the world? How might the canon and the art historical narratives themselves have changed? With these questions as starting points, the exhibition unfolds in more than ten thematic chapters as a many-voiced collaboration of internal and external curators, encompassing the whole exhibition space of the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin. Hello World places the focus on transnational artistic networks and cross-cultural entanglements from the late 19th century to the present. The exhibition presents over 120 paintings, sculptures, installations, videos and films by some 80 artists, chosen from the collection of the Nationalgalerie. These provide points of departure for an exploration into hidden stories and new perspectives on the collection and its history. Such stories include Heinrich Vogeler’s path to the Soviet Union, Dadaist Tomoyoshi Murayama’s sojourn in Berlin in the 1920s, and the collaborations between Nicolás García Uriburu and Joseph Beuys. To do so, Hello World also incorporates works drawn from the collections of the Ethnologisches Museum, the Museum für Asiatische Kunst, the Kupferstichkabinett, and the Kunstbibliothek (all also of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin), as well as the Staatsbibliothek Berlin and international loans.
Event information:
Berlin | Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin
04-28-2018 - 08-26-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Towards Impressionism
Towards Impressionism
Landscape Painting from Corot to Monet
Towards Impressionism traces the development of French landscape painting from the schools of Barbizon and Honfleur up to Impressionism, featuring over forty works from the extraordinary collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Reims. Selections from the Frye Art Museum’s own holdings will be incorporated into the show, making this a unique opportunity to situate masterpieces from the collection within their original context. The Reims museum has one of the world’s foremost collections of landscape paintings by artists associated with the Barbizon colony—artists like Théodore Rousseau, Charles-François Daubigny, Jean-François Millet, and Constant Troyon who gathered in the village of Barbizon between 1830 and 1855 to paint in and around the nearby Forest of Fontainebleau. Fascinated by the mysteries of the forest and rural tradition, the Barbizon artists rejected urban life and the teachings of the French Academy. Where previously landscape had served only as backdrop for allegorical or historical tableaux, the Barbizonists painted landscape for its own sake, working from observation but often infusing their subjects with an emotionality reminiscent of Romanticism.
Event information:
Seattle | Frye Art Museum
05-12-2018 - 08-05-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Innovative Impressions
Innovative Impressions
Prints by Cassatt, Degas, and Pissarro
Innovative Impressions explores an under-studied aspect of three Impressionists' careers: their groundbreaking prints and the techniques they developed through collaboration and experimentation. The artists of the Impressionist group are known for their innovative painting methods. Three of these artists—Mary Cassatt, Edgar Degas, and Camille Pissarro—also expanded the boundaries of the print medium in similar ways. Innovative Impressions highlights the groundbreaking printmaking techniques practiced by three artists who learned from each other while developing very different bodies of work. Thanks to such artistic exchanges, the artists produced prints that were among the most daringly creative works of their careers. Philbrook is the exclusive venue for the exhibition, which is curated by Sarah Lees, Hardman Curator of European Art, and features a wide range of prints along with key paintings by each artist, lent from collections across the US.
Event information:
Tulsa | Philbrook Museum of Art
06-09-2018 - 09-09-2018
Accompanying publication:
Cover for  Europe and the Sea
Europe and the Sea
From a geographic perspective, Europe is a maritime continent. In terms of length of coastline relative to its overall size, Europe is the most sea-bound of all the five continents. Nevertheless, Central and Eastern Europe in particular can often seem very remote from the sea. At first glance, the sea for many nations only plays a role in the daily lives of those who live on the coast, or as a holiday destination. How fundamental the sea has been in shaping Europe’s development, and the role it continues to play right up to the present day, will be highlighted from June 2018 in a new special exhibition entitled Europe and the Sea. The exhibition investigates the sea’s significance as a space in which Europeans ruled and traded, as a bridge and border, a resource, and a place of imagination and memory. Using 13 distinct themes, each assigned a European seaport to serve as an example, the display encompasses a historical range spanning from antiquity through to the immediate present. This in turn demonstrates how mastery of the seas over the centuries has represented a significant component of European power politics. Today, the role of the sea as a bridge and border is once again of urgent relevance: millions of people fleeing war, terror, and poverty are setting off for Europe. However, other factors such as the use and exploitation of the oceans’ resources concern us more than ever, and will in the future play a significant role for the environment and global climate.
Event information:
Berlin | Deutsches Historisches Museum
06-13-2018 - 01-06-2019
Accompanying publication:
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